Our people

 
 

Health and safety

An employee working at our Eco Manufacturing Centre in Zetland, NSW.

Direction

  • Embed a safety culture.
  • Implement benchmark systems, processes and tools so that Health and Safety risks and associated injuries are addressed.

10/11 objectives

How did we do?

Recruit a national health and safety specialist to work with our executive team and the health and safety steering committee in developing strategies to embed a safety culture in the business.

  • A national health and safety manager was appointed in September 2010, with the addition of two further safety professionals to build a national health and safety team of five.

Create and implement benchmark rehabilitation and injury management systems and processes.

  • An external review of national workers compensation management and systems was conducted. A key recommendation was to appoint a dedicated injury advisor. This position was filled in June 2011.

Identification and elimination of unacceptable risks in the workplace through further development and operational deployment of the new incident and injury database.

  • Knowledge and awareness has improved through the review and communication of our national safety policy, the development of a new safety training package and improvements to the functioning of our site safety committees.

The development and implementation of an OHS risk assessment framework, including a more rigorous site audit program.

In addition to LTIFR reporting, the final phases will allow for causal analysis and identification of high risk areas.

  • The reporting of hazards, incidents, injuries and near misses has enabled root cause investigation and corrective actions to be taken to reduce risk in identified areas. This will continue to be our approach to risk assessment and mitigation.

Raise our people’s knowledge and awareness for safe work practices.

We are targeting a minimum 10% improvement in LTIFR for 10/11 and will benchmark our performance against other similar operations.

  • Our LTIFR was 10.76 and the number of lost time injuries was 38.

11/12 objectives

  • Implement the health and safety strategic plan.
  • Target LTIFR of eight with greater confidence in accurate data.
  • Streamline injury management processes to reduce lost time injuries and claims timeframes to minimise personal impact of injuries to employees.
  • Deliver a health and safety management system that is in line with legislative requirements.
  • Improve health and safety communications and access to resources through web developments.
  • Increase reporting on all hazards, incidents, injuries and near misses to identify all risks and implement appropriate corrective actions and further reduce risk.
  • Continue safety training to management and safety committee members
  • Release a new employee safety induction program
  • Improve dashboard reports to executive and divisional management and employees.

10/11 has witnessed a robust review of health and safety management facilitated by the establishment of a national health and safety team.

While some fundamentals and priority areas were addressed, significant work is still required for our health and safety management system to be effective. Strong leadership, safe behaviour, continuous risk reviews, reduction of injuries and the continuous improvement of our system, will drive our safety performance. In addition we need to embed and support a safety culture within our organisation.

Strong leadership, safe behaviour, continuous risk reviews, reduction of injuries and the continuous improvement of our system, will drive our safety performance.

Establishing a safety culture

There is no one measure that will establish a safety culture in our organisation. We are aware this will be the long-term outcome of leadership endorsement, awareness-raising and capability development, supported by a rigorous approach to safety management, reporting and risk mitigation. However, encouraging a leadership focus on safety has been critical in shifting perceptions of health and safety from a regulatory compliance exercise to a fundamental management function that cannot be neglected.

In the year under review our executive leadership team, in consultation with employees, reviewed and updated the organisation’s health and safety policy. Safety consultation with senior management has been another area of focus. Executive general managers, the management community and other key management groups have participated in safety training. Safety is now the first agenda item at many management meetings.

Improving safety management

Our first step in improving safety management was an audit in line with AS/NZS 4801 standards on our safety management system. The audit identified a range of issues and areas for improvement in our policies, plans, implementation, measurement and evaluation and management review.

The areas for improvement have been prioritised based on risk and form the basis of our new health and safety strategic plan, which will be implemented in 11/12. A key audit recommendation was the revision of the existing safety manual so that our people would have a user-friendly resource providing clear guidance and assistance. Work on this manual has commenced and will be completed in 11/12.

In 10/11 we had an objective to create and implement benchmark rehabilitation and injury management systems and processes. An external third party has conducted a preliminary assessment, policy and procedure review and gap analysis of our national workers compensation management and systems. Based on their recommendation, an injury management advisor was appointed to assist injured workers and support their return to work goals.

Strong safety management will also be enabled through the effective operations of our site committees. In 10/11 we reviewed the efficacy of our committees; ensuring participants attend the required training. In addition, our first aiders and emergency response teams have also received the training required to support them in their roles.

Injuries by job function Lost time injury frequency during 10/11 Mechanism of job injuries during 10/11

Measuring safety performance

A number of safety indicators such as claimable injuries, lost time injuries (LTIs) and lost time injury frequency rate (LTIFR) are now regularly monitored against targets and form a key component of our safety strategy.

In 09/10 we achieved an LTIFR of 8.7; however we have low levels of confidence in the accuracy of the data for that year and for 10/11. We have taken steps to ensure data accuracy will be improved in 11/12. Our LTIFR for the year under review was 10.76 and the number of lost time injuries was 38. This increase reflects improved levels of reporting and greater visibility over injuries in the workplace.

There is no one measure that will establish a safety culture in our organisation. We are aware this will be the long-term outcome of leadership endorsement, awareness-raising and capability development, supported by a rigorous approach to safety management, reporting and risk mitigation.

While the business did not achieve the targeted 10 percent reduction in LTIFR during this period, the recent expansion of the safety and injury management team(s) will provide the skill base to support the business in this goal.

Mitigating safety risks

Risk assessment and risk management have been high priorities in the year under review. We found that our warehouses, our Eco Manufacturing Centre, the Customer Support Organisation and our Global Services operations on customer sites require closest attention; these aspects of our business are being provided the highest levels of safety support to reduce the risk of incidents and injuries.

Fuji Xerox Australia national distribution centre in Mascot, NSW.

Improved hazard and incident reporting has been structured to ensure proactive reporting of incidents so that risks can be identified and mitigated. Reporting is quickly followed by investigation to determine root causes, in a way that maximises consultation with key stakeholders, and leads to corrective actions being taken to reduce risk. The safety team also support the business with risk assessments, safe work method statements and records these matters in safety committee minutes.

Safety inspections have been conducted at 12 of our 20 locations and at several Global Services customer sites, leading to the identification of risks so they can be rectified and safety improved within these work areas. Where required, we have engaged specialist consultants such as hygienists and safety professionals to gain reports and recommendations to further address and remedy specific risks.

Contractor management has been another high-risk area of focus. We were audited by a key customer who reviewed our systems and processes for contractors. We are working with the customer to review and improve our safety management procedures for contractors to bring us into line with the customer standards for working in isolated geographic locations. Work has also begun on reviewing our contractor management procedures across all areas of the business. We have created an information kit and safety handbook, which contains specific site induction details and safety resources to support the safety management of our contractors on site. These will be rolled out in 11/12.

Forklift training, re-skilling, and licence management for our warehouse staff has also been a high risk area requiring specific attention. A database has been set up with licence renewal timeframes, and this is monitored closely to ensure all employees are re-accredited according to licence requirements.